Title : Citrus Problems in Hot Summer
Visit Count : 1193 Time(s)
Upload Date : 6/28/2016 - 1 Year(s) ago
Category : citrus
Tuesday, June 28, 2016
Visit Count : 1193 Time(s)
Upload Date : 6/28/2016 - 1 Year(s) ago
Category : citrus
Sudden changes in temperature, particularly when high temperatures occur at or shortly after fruit set, can cause fruit drop. Where citrus trees are planted in poorly drained or low-lying sites, fruit drop caused by brown rot can become problematic following extended periods of wet and warm weather in late summer and fall.Whether you're growing your citrus tree for the fruit it produces or as an ornamental specimen for its form, foliage, flowers and fruit, you're likely alarmed when the citrus fruits begin to drop prematurely. Some amount of fruit drop at a certain stage of development is normal, but an excessive drop of older fruit could indicate a number of problems. Sunburned leaves appear yellow. Sunburning of the leaves occurs when the tree is under irrigated,causing the leaves to cup, exposing the more sun sensitive lower leaf surface. Excessive fruit drop occure, especially on young trees. Good water management is crucial to avoid excessive fruit drop and other citrus tree problems. Excessive watering, poorly drained soils or drought stress can lead to fruit drop. As a general rule, citrus trees prefer a slow, deep watering every five to 14 days during dry, hot weather, depending on the citrus tree's age, and every 14 to 30 days during cool, wet weather, or whenever the soil 6 inches below the surface near the tree feels dry to the touch. In late summer to early fall, excessive fruit drop can occur on mature trees of early and mid-season cultivars planted in low-lying or poorly-drained areas due to epidemics of brown rot associated with extended wet periods and warm temperature. Excessive fruit drop from maturity until harvest in some years can exceed 25% of the crop. These losses seem to be more serious when hot rainy fall weather conditions prevail. Minimize water stress with a good water management program to reduce fruit losses. In some cases, drop is more associated with the lower, shaded areas of the tree canopy. Fruit drop can be aggravated by low potassium levels in heavy crop load years. Inadequate fruit set and severe fruit drop are major causes of low yield of navel orange. Fruit drop after fruit set has been mainly attributed to problems associated with the small, secondary fruit that is embedded in the primary fruit of Navel oranges. Fruit damage may occur on fruit exposed for a long period of time to direct sunlight, most often on thin-skinned varieties, especially those trees bearing fruit that extend beyond the leaf canopy. The Murcott (Honey tangerine) is one of the most susceptible varieties to sunburn due to the tree growth habit. Sunburn causes the drying of the exposed portion of the peel, and the pulp and juice beneath it. Drying appears to be associated with over-maturity, a lack of water, excessive tree vigor, extended warm, and/or dry fall weather. During the hot summer months you will not want to prune your trees, and only sparingly if needed. The foliage of the trees help to protect their sensitive branches from sun damage. The trunk of a citrus tree is just as sensitive, but it can be easily protected by painting the trunk with a 50/50 mixture of white latex paint or wrapping the trunk shade cloth or burlap. Never let a citrus tree dry out completely for more than a day. Liberal use of mulches will conserve precious water. Less water is needed as evaporation is reduced and weeds are inhibited.

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/fruits-fall-off-citrus-trees-58631.html
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs141
http://gardenguy.com/citrus-trees/
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/citrus/tip-on-water-requirements-for-citrus-trees.htm


In This Category :
All rights reserved for Cooperative Companies Union of Mazandaran Gardeners , Copy Right 2015 Total Visits count :
231/662
Past 10 days report